Published On: Tue, Apr 16th, 2019

Facebook to Utilize A.I. To Detect Profiles of Users That Died

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Facebook has recently announced that artificial intelligence will be used to detect the profiles of users that have passed away. The use of AI is to prevent painful reminders to family and friends when it is the deceased birthday. The major social network added that it would be adding a section of tributes to the account that is memorialised, designated as to belong to a person that has passed away. Friend and family will still be able to add posts or even share photos in the designated area to remember these loved ones.

Facebook is Tightening the Rules

The rules are tightening on Facebook around who exactly could memorialise the account of a deceased person. Until recently, anyone was allowed to memorialise an account by directly sending the social media network proof of that the account holder had died, which would require an obituary. Due to the new rules, it has to be done by a family member or a friend. These changes followed the response of users that experienced the profiles of their loved ones pop up on Facebook after they passed away. The company explained that sometimes, people are not ready to memorialise the profile of a person who has passed away immediately one they die. For many, it is a huge step, and they need to have the time to get ready for it. Facebook, on the other hand, will utilise AI intelligence to prevent these profiles from showing up in any place where it could cause distress; this includes reminders about upcoming birthdays.

Facebook Tributes Help Grievers Cope

Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer, lost her husband in 2015 and the tributes on Facebook to her late husband, helped her cope with the grief. The Facebook profile help many deal with their pain and is seen as a way to keep their memories alive.

The CEO of Facebook has also recently spoken out in New York regarding stricter regulations regarding harmful content, data and privacy portability. Mark Zuckerberg also told the Washington Post that regulators and governments should be more active in internet policing. More regulation is needed to prevent harmful content and baselines are required that prohibits specific content.

He feels that the privacy rules such as that of the General Data Protection Regulation taking effect last year in Europe should be adopted worldwide. These statements follow only days after Facebook was slated for the New Zealand killings that were broadcasted live on the site. Zuckerberg and others realise that it’s the wild west of the internet where social media sites are used for hate speech. For this reason, stricter rules and regulations are needed from government entities.

For more than two years, Facebook was criticised for privacy lapses as well as the spreading of disinformation. The site was also guilty of allowing Russian agents to use it for hate speech and abuse. The Facebook CEO shared that he is shifting the focus of the media site to messaging services designed to ensure privacy.

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